About Bruce Low

Inspector of homes, condominiums, cottages, multiplex residential structures and light commercial buildings for buyers and sellers. Maintenance, preservation, and safety inspections for home and building owners. Rental Weatherization (DILHR), caretaker, and construction progress draw inspections. Radon testing. Licensed, bonded and insured.

Bruce Low Attends WAHI Fall 2019 Training Seminar

Bruce Low, Owner/Inspector of Bottom Line Home Inspection of Luxemburg, attended the Fall Training Seminar of the Wisconsin Association of Home Inspectors (WAHI) on November 8 and 9 in Wisconsin Dells, WI.  He successfully completed course studies in Home Performance; Foundation Repair; Asbestos – What Matters, What Doesn’t; Using Your Senses to Locate Water Damage.  Inspector Low is also a member of the WAHI Peer Review and Education House Committee, and the WAHI Public Relations Committee.

 

To maintain their Home Inspector license, the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services requires home inspectors acquire 40 continuing education credit hours during each biennial license registration period.  Low received 15 credit hours for completing this training seminar, and he averages over 100 credit hours biennially.

 

Bottom Line Home Inspection, a service of B.J. Low, LLC, is a full time inspection company serving home and commercial building buyers and sellers in much of Northeast Wisconsin, including Brown, Door, Kewaunee and Manitowoc Counties.  Bruce Low can be reached at 920-255-2197 or www.bottomlinehi.com.

My Neighbor’s Home a Total Loss

This past Wednesday my neighbor’s home went up in smoke.  The family, Holly Berkovitz, her 3 kids and 2 grandkids, got out OK but lost everything.

Please follow this link if you would like to help out via GoFundMe.com:

https://www.gofundme.com/f/1lq6fm1i00?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet

Bruce Low Attends WAHI 2019 Spring Training Seminar

Bruce Low, Owner/Inspector of Bottom Line Home Inspection of Luxemburg, attended the Spring Training Seminar of the Wisconsin Association of Home Inspectors (WAHI) on March 29 and 30 in Milwaukee, WI.  He successfully completed course studies in The Business Side of Home Inspecting; Wisconsin Foundation Repair Standards; New Technologies in Residential Construction; Electrical – Grounding and Bonding.  Inspector Low is also a member of the WAHI Peer Review and Education House Committee, and the WAHI Public Relations Committee.

To maintain their license, the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services (WI DSPS) requires home inspectors acquire 40 Continuing Education Credit (CEC) hours each 2 year licensing period.  Inspector Low received 15 CEC hours for completing this training seminar.  He averages over 50 CEC hours annually.

Bottom Line Home Inspection, a service of B.J. Low, LLC, is a full time inspection company serving home and commercial building buyers and sellers in much of Northeast Wisconsin, including Brown, Calumet, Door, Kewaunee, Manitowoc, Oconto, Outagamie and Shawano Counties.  Inspector Low can be reached at 920-255-2197 or www.bottomlinehi.com.

Wisconsin’s 2019 Statewide Tornado Drill is April 11

Wisconsin’s statewide tornado drill is April 11

April 8-12 is Wisconsin’s Tornado and Severe Weather Awareness Week in Wisconsin. During that week, Wisconsin Emergency Management, the National Weather Service (NWS) and the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association (WBA) have once again teamed up to sponsor the statewide tornado drills scheduled for Thursday, April 11.

Schools, businesses, families, and individuals have two opportunities to test their emergency plans during statewide tornado drills April 11. The drills are part of the annual spring severe weather campaign to encourage everyone in Wisconsin to be ready for possible tornadoes and severe weather.

According to the NWS, Wisconsin averages 23 tornadoes annually. However, in 2018 the National Weather Service (NWS) confirmed 33 tornadoes in the state. This included 19 tornadoes on Aug. 28, the second largest August tornado outbreak in Wisconsin’s weather history. One of those tornadoes near Brownsville in Dodge County was rated EF2 with winds near 125 mph – the strongest of the year.

The drill on April 11 will begin with a mock tornado watch at 1 p.m., followed by a statewide mock tornado warning at 1:45 p.m. Many radio and TV stations across the state will issue the test tornado warnings. In addition, mock alerts will be issued on NOAA Weather Radios and many communities will sound their tornado sirens to test their emergency severe weather plans. Later, a mock tornado warning will be issued at 6:45 p.m. to give families and second-shift workers a chance to practice their emergency plans.

The tornado drill will take place even if the sky is cloudy, dark or rainy. If actual severe storms are expected in the state on Thursday, April 11, the tornado drills will be postponed until Friday, April 12 with the same times. If severe storms continue Friday, the drills will be cancelled.

Any changes will be issued to local media as well as posted on the ReadyWisconsin website at http://readywisconsin.wi.gov.

Adjustable Collar Tie

Bumper jack collar tie in a garage.  Note the 3/8” cable on the left and the 2 strands of baling wire on the right.  Where’s the weak link?  BTW Youngsters – bumper jacks are before your time.  Cars @ 60 years ago had real bumpers, strong to raise the car to change a flat tire.

Danger Above

Watch where you are walking!. This icicle, about 2.5 feet long, speared itself into a hard (enough for deer to walk on) snow drift outside my front door. Imagine if it were your head.

Electrical Panels in Bathrooms

By today’s standards, electrical panels are not permitted in bathrooms (nor closets). Observed from time to time are electrical panels located above toilets, usually in the basement of old homes. Other than move the panel (very costly) or remove the toilet (fairly inexpensive), not much can be done. I report to my clients that the condition is a Safety Hazard.

Stairway To Where?

Owner converted a 2nd (back) stairway in an upper/lower flat to a closet on the lower level by installing a wall several steps up from the bottom.  OK, but why didn’t they remove the handrail instead of dealing with the extra work to build it into the wall?……